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Vintage Honda Owners,
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Rocker Arm with lateral movement
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LOUD MOUSE
honda305.com Member


Joined: 15 Aug 2005
Posts: 7732
Location: KERRVILLE, TEXAS

PostPosted: Fri Jul 12, 2019 7:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As I've found the tensioner can handle the whip as long as it is adjusted per HONDA spec and not ignored. .....................lm


deuce_7 wrote:
LOUD MOUSE wrote:
As I discussed with you about that pin not being flush with the casting I can say I'd never seen it before but "there it was"!
Also you may want to "look at the valve stems" for ware when you remove the "adjuster screws"!
One thing at a time. Right?. ..............lm


Yes, one thing at a time; I'll address the tappet adjusting screws and examine the valve stems next.

LM, you mentioned loosening rivets in the cam sprocket / governor mechanism as a possible noise source. Also, as the cam chain wears, there's probably a point where the tensioner can no longer eliminate the "whip" at certain RPMs? Noise can be generated as a slackening chain travels and rotates in the casing? (I think this has been addressed in other threads).

mcconnellfrance, thanks for your comments. The noise you describe is at the other end of the spectrum; i.e., higher RPMs. The noise in my engine has been most noticeable at start up and lower RPMs, but I probably just don't hear it while riding.
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deuce_7
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Joined: 18 Mar 2018
Posts: 24
Location: California

PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2019 11:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

LOUD MOUSE wrote:
As I've found the tensioner can handle the whip as long as it is adjusted per HONDA spec and not ignored. .....................lm


Not much to adjusting the cam chain tensioner - I think that part is done. I wonder, is a worn/slack oil filter drive chain known to make noise?
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LOUD MOUSE
honda305.com Member


Joined: 15 Aug 2005
Posts: 7732
Location: KERRVILLE, TEXAS

PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2019 12:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Have you done it the HONDA way?. ................lm

deuce_7 wrote:
LOUD MOUSE wrote:
As I've found the tensioner can handle the whip as long as it is adjusted per HONDA spec and not ignored. .....................lm


Not much to adjusting the cam chain tensioner - I think that part is done. I wonder, is a worn/slack oil filter drive chain known to make noise?
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deuce_7
honda305.com Member


Joined: 18 Mar 2018
Posts: 24
Location: California

PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2019 1:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

LOUD MOUSE wrote:
Have you done it the HONDA way?. ................lm

deuce_7 wrote:
LOUD MOUSE wrote:
As I've found the tensioner can handle the whip as long as it is adjusted per HONDA spec and not ignored. .....................lm


Not much to adjusting the cam chain tensioner - I think that part is done. I wonder, is a worn/slack oil filter drive chain known to make noise?


From the workshop manual (Clymer):
- Loosen the tensioner bolt
- Rotate the crankshaft until the generator rotor “T” mark is 180 degrees from the stator indicator (comment: that would be ”LT” correct?) and tighten the tensioner adjusting bolt.
- This automatically tightens the cam chain to proper tension.

The official issued-by-Honda CL77 (1967) owners manual doesn’t get into the detail above. It says:
- Loosen the lock nut and then loosen the adjusting bolt and the chain will be tensioned automatically.
- Tighten the lock nut firmly.

Which is the “HONDA way?” And is there much difference between the two?
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LOUD MOUSE
honda305.com Member


Joined: 15 Aug 2005
Posts: 7732
Location: KERRVILLE, TEXAS

PostPosted: Sat Jul 13, 2019 1:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ya have it petty right.
At one time HONDA offered, "loosen the bolt, make sure the shaft will move in and out, turn the rotor and if the shaft goes In and Out , notice where it is "IN" the most and set the bolt.
DO NOT PUSH ON THE SHAFT to set the bolt. ...............lm

deuce_7 wrote:
LOUD MOUSE wrote:
Have you done it the HONDA way?. ................lm

deuce_7 wrote:
LOUD MOUSE wrote:
As I've found the tensioner can handle the whip as long as it is adjusted per HONDA spec and not ignored. .....................lm


Not much to adjusting the cam chain tensioner - I think that part is done. I wonder, is a worn/slack oil filter drive chain known to make noise?


From the workshop manual (Clymer):
- Loosen the tensioner bolt
- Rotate the crankshaft until the generator rotor “T” mark is 180 degrees from the stator indicator (comment: that would be ”LT” correct?) and tighten the tensioner adjusting bolt.
- This automatically tightens the cam chain to proper tension.

The official issued-by-Honda CL77 (1967) owners manual doesn’t get into the detail above. It says:
- Loosen the lock nut and then loosen the adjusting bolt and the chain will be tensioned automatically.
- Tighten the lock nut firmly.

Which is the “HONDA way?” And is there much difference between the two?
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View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail AIM Address
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